An analysis of the mending wall by robert frost

Mending wall analysis line by line

The poem, thus, grows through contrasts and contra-dictions. Due to their mysterious shape, the narrator and neighbor find it quite difficult to put them in their previous position. He will not go behind his father's saying, And he likes having thought of it so well He says again, "Good fences make good neighbours. The gaps I mean, No one has seen them made or heard them made, 10 But at spring mending-time we find them there. They anticipate the difficulty in putting them to use and believe that it would need a spell to balance them together so that the boulders stand on one another. He moves in darkness as it seems to me, Not of woods only and the shade of trees. Though no wall, no barrier is required to maintain harmony and peace between people and nations, yet some kind of self-exercised limitation is inevitable to avoid confrontation. The narrator opens with some of his reflections, about the way nature seems to battle, in its mysterious way, against a wall. In our lives, where a wall acts as a hurdle for people like seemingly unsociable, it also helps respect the privacy of your neighbor. He does not believe in walls for the sake of walls.

It comes to little more: There where it is we do not need the wall: He is all pine and I am apple orchard. But here there are no cows. It is the narrator who selects the day for mending and informs his neighbor across the property.

mending wall questions and answers

The work of hunters is another thing: I have come after them and made repair Where they have left not one stone on a stone, But they would have the rabbit out of hiding, To please the yelping dogs.

It comes to little more: There where it is we do not need the wall: From lines 9 to 22, the narrator says that though no one has ever heard the noise or seen anyone making the gaps, they do exist when it is time to mend the walls during spring season.

It seems as if nature is attempting to destroy the barriers that man has created on the land, even as man continues to repair the barriers, simply out of habit and tradition. As Jennings points out, "Frost solemnly indulges at length in the pathetic fallacy even though, somewhat paradoxically perhaps, he often writes about inanimate objects as if they were alive".

Mending wall poem

Every year, stones are dislodged and gaps suddenly appear, all without explanation. He does not believe that a wall should exist simply for the sake of existing. The narrator feels that his neighbor is too ignorant to convince. Something there is that doesn't love a wall, That wants it down. The narrator of the poem feels there is no need to mend the wall as there is no cattle but only pine and apple trees. No one has seen them made or heard them made, But at spring mending-time we find them there. The work of hunters is another thing: I have come after them and made repair Where they have left not one stone on a stone, But they would have the rabbit out of hiding, To please the yelping dogs.

He is highly regarded for his realistic depictions of rural village especially settings from his life in rural New England to examine complex, philosophical questions.

But it was Frost who framed the popular phrase to reiterate the old wisdom.

An analysis of the mending wall by robert frost

They find the task just like another outdoor game with the wall-line demarcating the two opponents playing from across the line. The narrator says that sometimes the wall is damaged by some careless hunters, who pull down the stones of the walls in search of rabbits to please their barking dogs. My apple trees will never get across And eat the cones under his pines, I tell him. He says he lets his neighbour across the dividing line know about the damages so they can repair them together. One day, when both of them narrator and neighbor determine to walk along the wall, they are surprised to see stones scattered on the ground. I see him there Bringing a stone grasped firmly by the top In each hand, like an old-stone savage armed. There are no stanza breaks, obvious end-rhymes, or rhyming patterns, but many of the end-words share an assonance e.

Through the dispute between the neighbours, he brings to the forefront the frequent clash of tradition and modernity where youth is trying to tear down the ideals of tradition and old is willing to do just about anything to cling to these existing tradition and beliefs.

This is to indicate how difficult it was to mend the wall on a regular basis.

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Mending Wall by Robert Frost: Summary and Analysis